NCWC: The Dirty Dozen: 12 Foods You Should Always Buy Organic

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The Dirty Dozen: 12 Foods You Should Always Buy Organic

The Environmental Working Group released its 2015 report on pesticide residue in fruits and vegetables on Wednesday.

February 25, 2015

Willy Blackmore is TakePart’s Food editor.

When it comes to buying fruit, comparing organic with conventionally grown options can be like apples and oranges—even when all you’re trying to buy is apples.

A pound of apples costs roughly between $1 and $1.50, according to the most recent data from the USDA. If you want to go organic, you’ll pay about $1 more per pound.

You could make a case for the apples being worth more, however, because you’re buying a not insignificant amount of pesticides with that fruit, according to analysis of government data by the Environmental Working Group. In the latest iteration of the Dirty Dozen, released Wednesday, apples once again topped the list of the 12 fruits and vegetables (well, 14, really) that retain the highest amount of pesticides and other toxic agricultural chemicals.

According to the accompanying report, two-thirds of the more than 3,000 produce samples analyzed by the USDA tested positive for pesticide residue. A study published earlier this month by the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that eating organic reduced people’s exposure to pesticides—but that even sticking to an all-organic diet could still result in some pesticide intake. Chemicals used in agriculture can have severe health effects on agricultural workers, and there are concerns that low-level, long-term exposure could contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and autism.

So if you’re a budget-conscious shopper—and who isn’t, really?—but aren’t looking for a good deal on some value-added pesticides, that extra dollar per pound for apples is well spent. The same goes for peaches, nectarines, strawberries. and grapes, which round out the top five. And the consumer-friendly guide will show you where to make up for your more expensive organic purchases with the Clean Fifteen, a list of those items that bear the least amount of residue. Avocados, which top the less toxic list, are nearly pesticide-free even when conventionally grown; just 1 percent of the fruit sampled showed remnants of farming chemicals.

“We are saying, eat your fruits and vegetables,” Sonya Lunder, EWG’s senior analyst, said in a statement. “But know which ones have the highest amounts of pesticides so you can opt for the organic versions, if available and affordable, or grab a snack off the Clean Fifteen.”

Dirty Dozen

Apples
Peaches
Nectarines
Strawberries
Grapes
Celery
Spinach
Sweet bell peppers
Cucumbers
Cherry tomatoes
Snap peas (imported)
Potatoes
Hot peppers
Kale and collard greens

Clean Fifteen

Avocados
Sweet corn
Pineapples
Cabbage
Sweet peas (frozen)
Onions
Asparagus
Mangos
Papayas
Kiwi
Eggplant
Grapefruit
Cantaloupe
Cauliflower
Sweet potatoes

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NCWC: Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick

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NCWC: Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick

Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick

Digestive, skin, bladder and kidney problems, fatigue and headache are just some of the adverse effects from not drinking enough water. We need it as much as air we breathe in! It’s not a joke.
Did you know that when you start feeling thristy your body is already dehydrated? The best practice is to sip water throughout a day. Have it always handy!If you’re not a morning person, have two glasses of water right after you wake up. It will boost up your blood pressure to normal levels, and it’s way healthier than having your first coffee on an empty stomach.

Also, don’t think that sweetened juices, soda or tea will hydrate you as well as water does. It’s actually the opposite! Sugar, as well as salt, makes your body waste precious water just to clean it out from your system. And if you love your coffee, make sure to drink one extra glass of water for every cup you have.

And as an added bonus, drinking water speeds up your metabolism and makes you feel more ‘full’. You will eat less once you start drinking more! It’s the safest and healthiest way to loose some weight.

Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick
Source: Rsvlts via Memolition

– See more at: http://www.thinkinghumanity.com/2014/05/why-dehydration-is-making-you-fat-and-sick.html?m=1#sthash.tlx8QO0v.dpuf

NCWC: Paleo Diet Linked to Decreased Colorectal Cancer

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Paleo Diet Linked to Decreased Colorectal Cancer

Paleo Diet Linked to Decreased Colorectal Cancer | The Paleo Diet

According to research recently conducted at Emory University in Atlanta, adherence to the Paleo Diet may significantly slash colorectal cancer rates.1 For their study, published online last month in the American Journal of Epidemiology, researchers examined the dietary habits of 2,301 men and women, 30 to 74 years old. Participants were categorized based on how closely their diets resembled the Paleo Diet. Overall, 564 participants developed colorectal adenoma, a benign tumor of the colon or rectum. Scientists classify colorectal adenoma as a precursor to colorectal cancer.2 For women with diets most closely resembling the Paleo Diet, tumor rates fell 29 percent compared to control groups. For men, Paleo Diet benefits were even more pronounced, with tumor rates falling 51 percent.

For those who study and follow the Paleo lifestyle, these results are hardly surprising. As the Paleo Diet becomes increasingly popular, however, it’s also more frequently misrepresented. Just last week, for example, Janet Helm of US News & World Report wrote about Paleo, “I don’t support this restrictive, meat-heavy diet that bans so many nutritious foods, such as dairy, grains and beans.”3 The Paleo Diet, of course, includes healthy animal foods, but disparagingly calling it “meat-heavy,” ignores the fact that it’s very vegetable-heavy. Could the Paleo Diet’s high vegetable level explain its protective effects against colorectal cancer?

Vegetables, of course, contain fiber and Western diets contain far less fiber than those of our Paleolithic ancestors. Whereas mean daily fiber intakes in the US range from 10 to 18 grams, our Paleolithic ancestors consumed upwards of 100 grams daily.4, 5 Some 40 years ago, an Irish surgeon named Denis Burkitt introduced the theory that increased consumption of dietary fiber decreases colorectal cancer risks.6 Burkitt’s theory gained traction and was eventually accepted as common knowledge, but a number of cohort studies and randomized controlled trials in recent decades have strongly challenged his contention.7 Although many prominent institutions, including the Harvard School of Public Health, no longer accept Burkitt’s theory, it may be premature to conclude that fiber consumption and colorectal cancer are unrelated.8

In an article published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, anthropologist Jeff Leach points out that fiber levels in studies challenging Burkitt’s theory, even for participants in the uppermost quintiles, are still far below evolutionary standards.9 We should also acknowledge fiber’s beneficial effects with respect to gut microbiome health. Increased fiber consumption promotes decreased intestinal inflammation, decreased body weight, and decreased obesity-induced chronic inflammation.10 While the causes of colorectal cancer are not entirely known, the Mayo Clinic lists inflammatory intestinal conditions, insulin resistance, obesity, smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, and sedentary lifestyle all as factors that may increase colorectal cancer risks.11

So what does this new research associating the Paleo Diet with decreased colorectal cancer really tell us? Does the Paleo Diet’s vegetable-heavy, and thus fiber-heavy, aspect account for this benefit? We cannot say so definitively. We can say, however, that the Paleo Diet is more than just a diet. It’s a lifestyle that promotes wellness and prevents disease. Most diseases, especially cancer, have multiple roots, the combination of which eventually grows into disease. This recent research is a testament to the holistic nature of the Paleo Diet and Paleo lifestyle, encompassing many informed decisions, which likely collectively protect against colorectal cancer.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

REFERENCES

1 Whalen, K., et al. (2014). Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores and Risk of Incident, Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas. American Journal of Epidemiology. Retrieved from http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/10/17/aje.kwu235.abstract

2 Srivastava, S., et al. (May 2001). Biomarkers for early detection of colon cancer. Clinical Cancer Research, 7(5). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11350874

3 Helm, Janet. (November 5, 2014). 8 Positive Outcomes of the Paleo Trend. US News & World Report. Retrieved from https://www.yahoo.com/health/8-positive-outcomes-of-the-paleo-trend-101439975577.html

4 Clemens, R., et al. (July 2012). Filling America’s Fiber Intake Gap: Summary of a Roundtable to Probe Realistic Solutions with a Focus on Grain-Based Foods. Journal of Nutrition, 142(7). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22649260

5 Leach, JD. (January 2007). Evolutionary perspective on dietary intake of fibre and colorectal cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61(1). Retrieved from Evolutionary perspective on dietary intake of fibre and colorectal cancer

6 Burkitt, DP. (July 1971). Epidemiology of cancer of the colon and rectum. Cancer, 28(1). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5165022

7 Lawlor, DA, and Ness, AR. (2003). Commentary: The rough world of nutritional epidemiology: Does dietary fibre prevent large bowel cancer? International Journal of Epidemiology, 32(2). Retrieved from http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/2/239.full

8 Nutrition Source, Harvard School of Public Health. Fiber and Colon Cancer: Following the Scientific Trail. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fiber-and-colon-cancer/

9 Ibid, Burkitt

10 Kuo, SM. (January 2013). The Interplay Between Fiber and the Intestinal Microbiome in the Inflammatory Response. Advances in Nutrition, 4(1). Retrieved from http://advances.nutrition.org/content/4/1/16.full

11 Mayo Clinic Staff. (August 2013). Diseases and Conditions: Colon Cancer: Risk Factors. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/colon-cancer/basics/risk-factors/con-20031877

NCWC muscle charts, water and booty blaster

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NCWC Health Tips

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NCWC: Chiropractic Reduces vs Chiropractic Improves

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NCWC: 2014 Resolutions, Shoveling Tips, Chiropractic Sheet..

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